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ASM

Annual Survey of Manufacturing

Description

  • Nature: Survey of the manufacturing industries covering all manufacturing locations, together with associated head offices, sales offices and auxiliary units.
  • Usage: The database can be used to study manufacturing industries' performances. The survey can be linked to various longitudinal databases based on establishment identifiers and industry classifications used in the various periods—with the help of concordances, when available—to push past the existing identifier and industry boundaries.
  • Content: Principal industrial statistics (such as shipments, employment, salaries and wages, cost of materials and supplies used, cost of purchased fuel and electricity used, inventories, goods purchased for resale, etc.) and commodity data, including shipments or consumption of particular products.
  • Coverage period: 1961 to 2012.

Funded Projects

Is there a conflict between economic growth and environmental sustainability? This project will assemble data that can be used to contribute to an evidence-based analysis of this question. As part of the project, Najjar has produced a data dictionary and user guide for the GHG-NPRI-ASM (Greenhouse Gas-National Pollutant Registry Inventory-Annual Survey of Manufacturing) database, which will be the basis of economic analysis that relates economic growth and the environment.

Related Data Sets
ASM, CBSA Customs

Related Research Themes
Incomes, Industry and Firm Analysis

Both pollution and climate change are known to negatively impact the health and productivity of workers. Research has primarily focused on how these factors affect outcomes of developing countries and the agricultural sector. Little is known about the impact of air pollution and climate change on manufacturing plants’ in developed countries. In developed countries such as Canada, the agricultural sector accounts for a small share (6.6 %) of gross domestic product (GDP) relative to that of the manufacturing sector (approximately 11 %). The purpose of this research is to study how the productivity of Canadian manufacturing plants is affected by the interaction of temperature and air pollution. While both temperature and pollution individually affect manufacturing plants’ outcomes, a mix of both could amplify these affects.

Additional data set: National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI)

Related Data Sets
ASM

Related Research Themes
Industry and Firm Analysis, Labour Markets

Despite half a century of experience with environmental regulation in Europe and North America, there is still much debate over the likely impacts of environmental regulation. For example, many believe that regulation comes at the cost of economic growth in the regulated region and these costs outweigh any potential environmental benefit. While the regulation does have costs, it is important to understand the trade-offs between these costs and environmental benefits. This research is designed to help inform policymakers and the public about the costs and benefits of climate policy, by quantifying the productivity impact of British Columbia’s carbon tax in the manufacturing sector.

Related Data Sets
ASM

Related Research Themes
Industry and Firm Analysis, International

The aim of the project is research the development and behavior of firms that operate in an economy affected by natural resource development and exploitation. Østenstad and Vermeulen (2016) provide a theoretical model that gives rise to various hypotheses surrounding the development of firms and their export decision in an economy that has the benefit of a natural resource windfall. The current project will apply this theoretical model to the Canadian case and data and test the hypotheses that come from the theoretical model.

The main research question is:
How are firms affected by an economy that experiences resource windfalls in terms of their sales, employment, wage costs, and export sales?

We aim to test the following hypotheses: Focusing on the non-resource related firms in a natural resource based economy, the expansion of natural resource production will lead to:

  • An expansion of manufacturing firms, in terms of new establishment, total sales and employment,
  • An expansion of the number of firms, who on average will have a relatively lower productivity
  • An increase in the observed average productivity among exporters and a decrease among non-exporters

We would like to further confirm the model’s mechanism that gives rise to an ambiguous effect on total export sales. Whereas the expansion of the entire sector should allow for more exporting firms, the increase in marginal costs will lead to a smaller share of firms that export. The data may further allow to observe how the size of the effect is related to the size of the natural resource sector, the distance from this sector and the regional government expenditures.

Related Data Sets
ASM

Related Research Themes
Industry and Firm Analysis

This project consists of three projects:

Project 1 - Complementarity of Performance Pay and Task Allocation

Bryan Hong, Lorenz Keung and Mu-Jeung Yang

Complementary management practices are those that are interdependent and together reinforce one another to improve overall firm performance. Research has suggested that such complementarity between different management practices is one underlying cause of differences in performance outcomes among firms. The purpose of this study is to examine the complementarity between two specific management practices: pay-for-performance and decentralization, the dispersion of decision making from a central authority to subgroups of the firm. While these practices have been empirically investigated individually, little is known about how the interaction between decentralization and pay-for-performance may affect firm performance.

Project 2 - Barbarians at the Gate: How foreign competition affects intra-organizational conflict

Bryan Hong and Romel Mostafa

Cyert and March (1963) describe the firm as the combination of interdependent groups, which often have competing interests. It is no surprise that such competing interests can lead to conflict within firms, also referred to as intra-organizational conflict. The effects of intra-organizational are well studied. Research has indicated that the time managers spend managing conflicts is substantial, suggesting the cost of conflicts within the firm are significant. Little is known about how forces outside of the firm affect the likelihood and prevalence of conflict within a firm. The purpose of this study is to estimate how one specific external force, foreign competition, affects the occurrence and frequency of intra-organizational conflict in the Canadian context. This study uses data from the Workplace and Employee (WES) survey conducted by Statistics Canada.

Project 3: Incentives as a Moderator of Conflict During Organizational Change

Bryan Hong

When a firm experiences an organizational change or restructuring, it is likely conflicts that disrupt the firm will occur. This study focuses on how organizational changes affect the prevalence of conflicts and employee grievances filed within the firm.  As a measure for organizational changes, this study employs changes in organizational structure (ex. centralization, decentralization, outsourcing etc.) from the WES survey. This study also investigates how the presence of group level pay-for-performance incentives (ex. profit sharing plans) affect the frequency of firm conflicts.

Additional datasets: Labour Force Survey (LFS) & General Index of Financial Information (GIFI)

Romel Mostafa is an Assistant Professor at the Ivey Business School, Western University

Lorenz Kueng is an Assistant Professor at Northwestern-Kellogg

Mu-Jeung Yang is an Assistant Professor at University of Washington, Seattle

Related Data Sets
ASM, WES

Related Research Themes
Industry and Firm Analysis, International

Does the Canada-US Free Trade Agreement (CUSFTA) reduce resource misallocation in Canada? The implementation of CUSFTA can be viewed as a natural experiment which makes it ideal for estimating the causal effect of trade policy on the misallocation of resources. To do this, I use both static and dynamic panel models with data from the Annual Surveys of Manufactures (ASM) for the period 1980 to 1996. I use tariff rates from Trefler (2004) and measure resource misallocation using the dispersion in revenue total factor productivity (TFPR). This study sheds light on how reversion back to CUSFTA following a collapse of NAFTA might impact productivity in Canada due to changes in resource misallocation.

Related Data Sets
ASM

Related Research Themes
International

Related Themes

Incomes

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International

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Papers and Publications

July, 2018

This study investigates whether the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (CUSFTA) reduced resource misallocation in Canada. The implementation of CUSFTA can be viewed as a natural experiment, which makes it an ideal setting for estimating the causal effect of trade policy on the misallocation of resources. I perform this estimation using a dynamic panel data model with data from the Canadian Annual Surveys of Manufactures (ASM) for the period from 1980 to 1996. I use tariff rates from Trefler (2004) and measure resource misallocation using the dispersion in revenue total factor productivity (TFP) within industries. I find that CUSFTA did reduce resource misallocation by approximately four percent and, consequently, increased TFP by around four percent in Canada. This increase in TFP translates into a contribution of 23 percent to the overall TFP growth of Canada's manufacturing sector.

Related Data Sets
ASM, ASM-I

Related Research Themes
Industry and Firm Analysis, International

Keywords: Misallocation, Trade policy, CUSFTA, Productivity

JEL Codes: O11, O47, F14, F13

June, 2017

March, 2017

Related Data Sets
ASM, ASM-I, CBSA Customs, CEEDD, CIP, CFA, LEAP, LWF, NALMF, SFSME, SIBS, T2-LEAP, TEC, WES

Related Research Themes
Incomes, Industry and Firm Analysis, International, Labour Markets

Presented at Data Day

Author(s)

Natalie Goodwin, Statistics Canada RDC Analyst, Western University RDC

Related Data Sets
ASM, ASM-I, CBSA Customs, CEEDD, CFA, CIP, LEAP, LWF, NALMF, SFSME, SIBS, T2-LEAP, TEC, WES

Related Research Themes
Incomes, Industry and Firm Analysis, International, Labour Markets

Keywords: RDC

Presented at Data Day

Outline

Accessing business microdata for research purposes at the Canadian Centre for Data Development and Economic Research (CDER) at Statistics Canada

  • CDER basics
  • Data sets available for access to CDER
  • Application process
  • Future directions
  • Other information

Related Data Sets
ASM, ASM-I, CBSA Customs, CEEDD, CFA, CIP, LEAP, LWF, NALMF, SFSME, SIBS, T2-LEAP, TEC, WES

Related Research Themes
Incomes, Industry and Firm Analysis, International, Labour Markets

Keywords: CDER; microdata; data access

Presented at Data Day

May, 2015

Author(s)

Kim P. Huynh works at the Bank of Canada

Related Data Sets
ASM, ASM-I, CBSA Customs, CEEDD, CFA, CIP, LEAP, LWF, NALMF, SFSME, SIBS, T2-LEAP, TEC, WES

Related Research Themes
Incomes, Industry and Firm Analysis, International, Labour Markets

Keywords: CDER; proposal; microdata

JEL Codes: Y9

June, 2013

This paper studies the effects of plant control changes on plant survival. A unique feature of the paper is that it groups new born plants as born-domestic and born-foreign, and groups plant control changes as foreign acquisitions and domestic acquisitions, and then analyzes the effects of foreign acquisitions and domestic acquisitions on the duration of born-domestic and born-foreign plants respectively. The differentiation of acquisitions and new plants along the foreign-domestic dichotomy helps disentangle ownership effects and acquisition effects, and thus could effectively compare which acquisition works better for which type of plants. Using 26 cohorts of plants born in Canada between 1973 and 1998, the paper finds that both foreign acquisitions and domestic acquisitions significantly increase life durations of born-domestic plants, although domestic acquisitions generate larger effects. For born-foreign plants, acquisitions do not seem to change their life durations.

Author(s)

Yanling Wang

Related Data Sets
ASM

Related Research Themes
Industry and Firm Analysis

Keywords: Foreign Acquisition, Domestic Acquisition, Plant Survival

JEL Codes: F2; L1

November, 2012